Updated: Aug 21


School of Human Sciences

Face and Voice Recognition Lab

Institute of Lifecourse Development

University of Greenwich

London

www.superrecognisers.com

super-recognisers@greenwich.ac.uk

Twitter: @GRecognisers


21 August 2022


The information in this blog was correct on 15 July 2022. We intend to update in September 2022, by including scores on the Cambridge Female Face Memory Test and the Glasgow Face Matching Test: Version 2: High 40


University of Greenwich Face and Voice Recognition Lab: Volunteer Participant Pool


Thank you to members of our volunteer pool who contribute to our research. We have been asked many times by volunteers, “what is a good score on these tests?” and we hope this blog will help answer that question.

Table of Contents

Volunteer participant pool

But who signs up to contribute to our research?

Test results:


· Cambridge Face Memory Test: Extended (n = 49,940)

· Glasgow Face Matching Test (n = 49,956)

· Kent Face Matching Test (n = 17,565)

· Old-New 30-60 Short-Term Face Memory Test (n = 27,491)

· Cambridge Cars Memory Test (n = 6,887)


Defining super-recognisers for police and business projects

Can members of the public take the face recognition tests we use with police?

Ethics information

Appendix A: Could you be a super-recogniser test (n = 1,000,000)

Appendix B: Tests described in this blog

Appendix C: Volunteer here: URL links to tests

The German version of this blog is now available below


The French version of this blog is now available below


Volunteer participant pool

The volunteer participant pool of the Face and Voice Recognition Lab of the University of Greenwich was established in 2015, when the Could you be a Super-Recogniser Test (see Davis, 2019), and the Glasgow Face Matching Test (GFMT; Burton et al., 2010) were first uploaded to our website. Participants could leave their e-mail address if interested in taking part in future research and they provided consent for us to retain test scores.

Later, the Cambridge Face Memory Test: Extended (CFMT+; Russell et al., 2009) was added to the test battery, followed by the Short-Term Face Memory Test 30-60 (STFMT3060, at one time described as the Adult Face Memory Test: Robertson et al., 2019), and then the Kent Face Matching Test (KFMT; Fysh & Bindemann, 2018) in 2021.


Recently, participants have also been asked to complete the Cambridge Cars Memory Test (CCarMT) (Dennett et al., 2011) for us to add the data to their records, and this is the first blog to report the initial results. We have additionally asked participants if we could retain scores on other tests (e.g., Voice Recognition Tests, the Cambridge Female Face Memory Test, and the Glasgow Face Memory Test: Version 2). However, only a subset of participants from the volunteer pool have taken these tests. We intend to report initial results in September 2022 by updating this blog.


Over a million participants from around the world completed the Could you be a Super-Recogniser Test within a few months of publication (about 7 million now, see Appendix A), and we soon found that those who left their contact details for future research invites tended to be far better at face recognition than what would be expected of a representative sample randomly drawn from members of the public. In other words, participants taking part in our tests tend to score higher than would be expected from a typical sample of the general population. There is clearly a self-selection bias at work.


It is most likely that super recognisers (even though rare in the population) are far more likely than non-super-recognisers to volunteer to take part in our research.


For this reason, please do not be deterred from contributing to our research if your test results appear disappointing in comparison to some others. If we invite you to our research, we are always very grateful for your contribution. We will never invite someone who is ineligible for a specific project. We do not want to waste anyone’s time.

But who signs up to contribute to our research?


At the time of writing (17.07.2022), we have contact details of 49,954 participants. At one time there were over 100,000, but when GDPR was introduced in 2018, all were e-mailed to check they wished to remain on the database. If no reply was received, their record was deleted. The pool was reduced to about 38,000 and it has been growing ever since.


Not all volunteers, have, however, provided a full set of the demographic data we request, partly because when the database was created, we did not always ask if we could store these data (age = 43,383; gender = 43,545; ethnicity = 47,963; country = 47,772; all four = 39,855). The reliability of these data is important, as a large body of research suggests that these factors can impact face recognition ability, and scores on different face recognition tests. Most people are aware of the cross-ethnicity effect (e.g., see Meissner & Brigham, 2001 for a review), in that people tend to be better at recognising faces from their own ethnicity than other ethnicities. Some research has found similar cross-age (e.g., Anastasi & Rhodes, 2005), and cross-gender effects (e.g., Herlitz & Lovén, 2013). It is possible these effects are driven by levels of contact with those from specific out-groups (Meissner & Brigham, 2001). For instance, someone whose ethnicity is East Asian, but who lives in Europe, may be more likely to score higher on a test comprising White faces only, than a gender- and age-matched individual who lives in East Asia.


With collaborators we have investigated the cross-age (Belanova et al., 2018), and cross-ethnicity effects (Carroll et al., 2021; Robertson et al., 2020) in super-recognisers.

Location: Table 1 provides an indication of where most members of the pool claim to live (note these data are from January 2022). Not surprisingly as the University of Greenwich is in London, over 20% of the volunteer pool come from the UK. The proportion of the pool located in other countries is probably dependent on the impact of media articles about super-recognition.


Table 1: Percentage of the volunteer pool from participants from the top 30 countries


What has been lost is that prior to the clear out following GDPR introduction, the fourth highest proportion came from China. Hardly any members of the volunteer pool claim to be from China now. On the opposite extreme, when the pool was first established, 17 claimed Antarctica as their home. One e-mailed to say they were working on a scientific base on the south pole. On the other hand, another participant once e-mailed from the ice cap in the far north. They took the tests while sheltering from a storm. While e-mailing, they commented they could hear a polar bear outside.


Gender and age: Over 38% of respondents describe themselves as male, over 61% as female. The mean age of the pool at about 39 years is far higher than that of typical student participants recruited to most research (Figure 1).


Figure 1: Age distribution of volunteer pool



Ethnicity: Slightly worryingly to us, as it demonstrates a lack of representativeness, is that the vast majority of members of the pool describe their ethnicity as White (82.0%). Although this statistic is similar to the proportion of White people in England and Wales (86%; Gov.uk, 2020), our participants come from around the world. This will limit some conclusions we can make from our findings, as the proportion of White people in the world population is clearly far lower. One reason may be linked to the fact that the tests described in this blog only contain White faces. We may be inadvertently deterring people from other ethnicities from contributing – we are highly conscious of this. We do employ tests containing faces of other ethnicities in our research and in our tests with police forces and businesses (see examples here and here). However, we do restrict access to these multi-ethnic face recognition tests for job deployment purposes, so as to ensure that no one taking them has an advantage from having taken the same tests previously.


Why do these tests contain White faces only? We wrote a previous blog about this, but when asking for volunteers to provide new images of themselves for new face recognition tests, we have found that White participants are far more likely to help. This is perhaps understandable given the regular negative media reports about errors associated with some computerised face algorithm research. It has also come to light that some of this research (not our research) has used facial stimuli of people who never provided consent for their images to be used in this way. For our research, we want to be 100% assured that everyone depicted has given their informed consent for image use. So much so, that we prefer participants who have taken our tests to provide facial images, as they will be properly informed as to the likely purpose their images will be used.


Nevertheless, the relative lack of suitable images has meant that we have not, as yet, been able to create freely available tests on the internet containing non-White faces. We are aiming to do so by creating the London Face Memory Test. The aim is that we can create a test that roughly represents the diverse population of London – one of the most multi-cultural cities in the world. Members of the volunteer pool will start receiving e-mails concerning the creation of this test soon.


(You are welcome to help by uploading your images HERE – you will receive a £5 Amazon voucher).


Test results (see Appendix B for test descriptions, Appendix C for links)

As we often receive emails from participants wondering how their scores compare to those of other participants, the distributions of the test scores for each of the main four tests taken by our participant pool are shown in Figures 2-5. From these, you should be able to compare your own scores with those of other participants on the database to get a very rough idea of how you may rate your face recognition skills.


Far more reliably, you can also compare your scores with those expected from typical members of the public, as we have superimposed lines (in green) representing the approximate mean score achieved by what we believe is probably the most representative sample drawn from members of the public on three of the four tests.


We have also included two lines representing the values one standard deviation (SD) above and one SD below the mean from those samples. Approximately, 68% of the population would be expected to generate a score that falls within those two lines (in red), whereas, in contrast, only 16% would be expected to score above the upper line on the right of each figure.


Figure 1: Cambridge Face Memory Test: Extended (CFMT+) scores

Note: CFMT+ “General public” data (n = 254) were reported in Bobak et al. (2016)


Figure 2: Glasgow Face Matching Test (GFMT) scores

https://superrecognisersinternational.com


Note: GFMT “General public” data (n = 194) were reported in Burton et al. (2010)


Figure 3: Kent Face Matching Test (KFMT) scores

Note: KFMT “General public” data were compiled from three articles (Fysh, 2018; Fysh & Bindemann, 2018; Gentry & Bindemann, 2019).

Figure 4: Short-Term Face Memory Test 30-60 (STFMT3060) scores


Figure 5: Cambridge Cars Memory Test (CCarMT) scores

Defining super-recognisers for police and business projects


We are certain that many people reading this blog will be hoping to find out if they can be defined as a super-recogniser based on their scores on these tests. Our answer is that if your scores are in the highest range on all four tests there is an extremely good probability that you may be a super-recogniser. However, as noted, with police and business projects we use additional tests with different designs that contain faces of different ethnicities, and indeed, of different ages. We believe that to be offered employment drawing on their skills, super-recognisers need to be able to generate exceptional scores on a wide range of different tests. The tests we use measure four main components (see Davis, 2019, Davis, 2020). Three of these components are short-term face memory (as also measured using the CFMT+ and STFMT3060), simultaneous face matching (as also measured using the GFMT and KFMT), and spotting faces in a crowd (see Davis et al., 2018 for a description of an early version of this test).


Superior Long-Term Face Memory: The Hallmark of Super-Recognition

The fourth component, however, long-term face memory ability, may best represent how super-recognition is perceived in the minds of super-recognisers themselves. Definitions of super-recognition in the media and in research articles also often refer to super-recogniser’s superior ability to recognise people spontaneously and reliably after delays of months or even decades. In that time the appearance of those people will have changed.


On this basis, it would be hard to argue that an accurate definition of super-recognition should be that “super-recognisers are individuals who possess extraordinarily accurate perceptual and long-term face identity processing skills”.

We have published one two-experiment paper examining face memory retention for up to two months only (Davis et al., 2020). Many participants classified as super-recognisers based on their CFMT+ and GFMT scores only, performed quite poorly on these tests of long-term face memory. There may be many reasons for poor performance on any face recognition test that bear no relationship with true ability (e.g., distractions, illness, lack of sleep, internet disruptions). These factors may have a greater impact as the gap between learning and test phases widens. Nevertheless, it could be argued that highly superior long-term face memory is the hallmark of super-recognition. None of the four tests described in this blog measure this skill. Therefore, we are naturally wary of certifying someone as a super-recogniser unless they have completed the full set of tests we use for police, some of which should be taken in invigilated examination conditions, to ensure test score integrity.


To the best of our knowledge, no other research group in the world or police organisation, includes face memory tests that measure memory for faces for more than a few minutes. It is our contention that without tests of this type it is impossible to describe someone as a super-recogniser.


Nevertheless, we have also compiled a battery of simultaneous face matching tests for job roles in organisations that only require superior face comparison/matching skills. Memory for faces is not required. Someone scoring in the top 2% of the population on tests measuring this skill might best be described as “super-matchers”.


Can members of the public take the face recognition tests we use with police?


It is possible for members of the public to take the full set of tests (see link below)


The University of Greenwich has a research consultancy contract with Super-Recognisers International (https://superrecognisersinternational.com/), who can arrange for administration of the tests. Those who achieve our Super-Recogniser criteria across all four components (scores expected by approximately the top 2% of the population), or our Super-Matcher criteria (scores expected by approximately the top 2% of the population on the simultaneous face matching tests only) can additionally become a licensee of the Association of Super-Recognisers (https://www.associationofsuperrecognisers.org/). Certificates are issued for those achieving standards.


However, Super-Recognisers International will charge for this service. There are two stages.


1. Online tests: The link to the online tests and up to date information about the costs of completing these tests can be found HERE. These measure Short-Term Face Memory, Simultaneous Face Matching, and Long-Term Face Memory. Some of the tests reported in this blog are included in the battery for research purposes. They do not need to be retaken. Previous scores can be manually entered as long as participants use the same e-mail address as on the volunteer pool database for checking. If someone chooses to take the tests, their scores will be sent by the University of Greenwich to Super-Recognisers International. The scores will be released only if that participant pays the required funds. The University of Greenwich is not involved in any payment or any agreements between the participant and Super-Recognisers International.


2. The examination-administered invigilated tests: These tests are normally incorporated into 3–4-day online or live training courses that provide a wider insight into legal and technical issues associated with jobs in which superior face recognition skills are important. The tests measured Spotting Faces in a Crowd, and because of the invigilated procedures allow us to confirm the possession of superior Short-Term Face Memory and Simultaneous Face Matching skills. Some licensees have secured jobs based on their test results, and therefore all involved must be assured that high scores have been achieved in reliable conditions. There are, however, substantial costs involved in administering tests that are partly conducted in examination conditions with someone either present in the room or remotely monitoring progress.


Because of the costs associated with taking these tests, we recommend that participants are confident that they do possess superior skills before taking these tests. Those whose scores are in the highest range in comparison to others on the histograms in Figures 1 to 4 should have a good understanding of this and they will be the most likely to achieve the required standards. However, it cannot be guaranteed that even the highest scorers on the tests available to the public will pass the final examination phase. Indeed, about 10% of those who take the examinations fail to achieve criteria, even though their scores will be higher than the vast majority of the population (we always offer one opportunity to resit the exams), while another 10%-20% achieve the status of super-matcher. The University of Greenwich is unable to provide predictions as to how anybody will perform in future tests based on their past performances.


A paper describing the results of this collaboration is currently being prepared for publication. It has taken longer than expected as the lab has been exceptionally busy with police projects in 2021 and 2022. It is hoped it will be published in 2023.

Ethics associated with our volunteer pool database


All participants give their consent for their data to be stored. In a second repository the participants' email addresses are also stored so that they can continue to be invited to participate in future research. When the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) went into effect in 2018, all participants were again informed by email about saving their data. If there was no response, the corresponding data was deleted. Those participants who decide to take part in the tests since then immediately receive the information about GDPR and about the possibility to withdraw their consent at any time.


More information about our ethical and data protection procedures can be found here.

References


Anastasi, J. S., & Rhodes, M. G. (2005). An own-age bias in face recognition for children and older adults. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 12, 1043-1047. DOI: 10.3758/BF03206441


Belanova, E., Davis, J. P., & Thompson, T. (2018). Cognitive and neural markers of super-recognisers' face processing superiority and enhanced cross-age effect. Cortex, 98, 91-101. DOI:10.1016/j.cortex.2018.07.008 (Download pre-print here: https://bit.ly/bdtb2018)

Bobak, A. K., Pampoulov, P., & Bate, S. (2016). Detecting superior face recognition skills in a large sample of young British adults. Frontiers in Psychology, 7(1378). https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01378

Burton, A. M., White, D., & McNeill, A. (2010). The Glasgow face matching test. Behavior Research Methods, 42(1), 286-291. DOI:10.3758/BRM.42.1.286


Correll, J., Ma., D. S., & Davis, J. P. (2020). Perceptual tuning through contact? Contact interacts with perceptual (not memory-based) face-processing ability to predict cross-race recognition. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 92, 104058, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jesp.2020.104058

Davis, J. P. (2020). CCTV and the super-recognisers. In C. Stott, B. Bradford, M. Radburn, and L. Savigar-Shaw (Eds.), Making an Impact on Policing and Crime: Psychological Research, Policy and Practice (pp 34-67). London: Routledge. ISBN 9780815353577. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780429326592 (Download free pre-print here: https://bit.ly/34Phwjm)

Davis, J. P., Bretfelean, D., Belanova, E., & Thompson, T. (2020). Super-recognisers: face recognition performance after variable delay intervals. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 34(6), 1350-1368. DOI:10.1002/acp.3712 (Download free pre-print here: https://bit.ly/3slkg0m)


Davis, J. P., Treml. F., Forrest, C., & Jansari, A (2018). Identification from CCTV: Assessing police super recognisers ability to spot faces in a crowd and susceptibility to change blindness. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 32(3), 337-353. DOI: 10.1002/acp.3405 (Download pre-print here: https://bit.ly/3dtfj2018


Dennett, H. W., McKone, E., Tavashmi, R., Hall, A., Pidcock, M., Edwards, M., & Duchaine, B. (2011). The Cambridge Car Memory Test: A task matched in format to the Cambridge Face Memory Test, with norms, reliability, sex differences, dissociations from face memory, and expertise effects. Behavior Research Methods, 44(2), 587–605. https://doi.org/10.3758/s13428-011-0160-2


Fysh, M. C. (2018). Individual differences in the detection, matching and memory of faces. Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications, 3(1), 1-12.


Fysh, M. C., & Bindemann, M. (2018). The Kent face matching test. British Journal of Psychology, 109(2), 219-231.


Gentry, N. W., & Bindemann, M. (2019). Examples improve facial identity comparison. Journal of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition, 8(3), 376-385.

Gov.uk (2020). Population of England and Wales. Downloaded 20 November 2021 from, https://www.ethnicity-facts-figures.service.gov.uk/uk-population-by-ethnicity/national-and-regional-populations/population-of-england-and-wales/latest


Herlitz, A., & Lovén, J. (2013). Sex differences and the own-gender bias in face recognition: A meta-analytic review. Visual Cognition, 21(9-10), 1306-1336. https://doi.org/10.1080/13506285.2013.823140


Meissner, C. A., & Brigham, J. C. (2001). Thirty years of investigating the own-race bias in memory for faces: A meta-analytic review. Psychology, Public Policy, and Law, 7(1), 3-35. https://doi.org/10.1037/1076-8971.7.1.3


Robertson, D., Black, J., Chamberlain, B., Megreya, A. M., & Davis, J. P. (2020). Super-recognisers show an advantage for other race face identification. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 34(1), 205-216. DOI: 10.1002/acp.3608 (Download free pre-print here: https://bit.ly/rbcmd2020)


Russell, R., Duchaine, B., & Nakayama, K. (2009). Super-recognizers: People with extraordinary face recognition ability. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 16(2), 252–257. https://doi.org/10.3758/PBR.16.2.252


Appendix A: Could you be a super-recogniser test


This fun test measures the ability to be familiarised to a face and to very shortly afterwards recognise that face from a sometimes-different angle amongst an array of highly similar foils. It consists of 14 trials in which a single black-and-white facial image is displayed for 5-sec from a frontal, 30 degree or profile view, and is immediately followed by an array of 6 or 8 faces. Participants are warned in advance that all trials are target present. In total, 7 million participants have taken this test.


Figure 1: Frequencies of total scores (out of 14) of the first one million participants on the 14-trial test: Could you be a Super-Recogniser? (M = 9.64, SD = 1.90) (Davis, 2019)


Appendix B: Tests described in this blog


Cambridge Face Memory Test: Extended (CFMT+) (Russell et al., 2009). This 102-trial standardised short-term face memory test is probably the most commonly used worldwide test of face recognition, although it was not originally designed to measure super-recognition. Due to anomalies such as that the faces are mainly depicted with no hair, and that it has been available on the internet for participants to practice over a number of years, it would be unwise to define anyone as a police super-recogniser based on the results of this test alone. The Mean score on this test in most research is about 70 out of 102 (SD = 10), and scores of 90-95 out of 102 have been used to diagnose super-recognition in previous research, being representative of 2 SD above control means, a score likely to be achieved by about 2% of the population.


Glasgow Face Matching Test (GFMT) (Burton et al., 2010). This 40-trial test measures the ability to distinguish between two highly similar appearing white-ethnic facial images. It does not rely on memory. Participants decide whether 40 pairs of high-quality facial photographs depict the same person or not. Half of the trials are ‘matched’ (i.e., the same person is depicted in the pair), half are mismatch trials. Participants are warned in advance of the randomly ordered but equal match-to-mismatch trial ratio. This test may be unsuitable for super-recogniser ‘diagnosis’ as it suffers from ceiling effects. Many participants score 100%.


The Kent Face Matching Test (KFMT) (Fysh & Bindemann, 2018). This 40-trial test measures the ability to distinguish between two highly similar appearing white-ethnic facial images. It does not rely on memory. Participants decide whether 40 pairs of high-quality facial photographs depict the same person or not. Half of the trials are ‘matched’ (i.e., the same person is depicted in the pair), half are mismatch trials. Participants are warned in advance of the randomly ordered but equal match-to-mismatch trial ratio.


Short-Term Face Memory Test 30-60 (STFMT3060). This 60-trial test measures short-term memory for unfamiliar black-and-white ethnic faces. In the learning phase of this test, 30 male faces are sequentially presented in identical purple sweatshirts for 10 sec. In the test phase, new photos of the 30 ‘old’ faces are randomly intermixed with 30 ‘new’ faces, wearing a variety of different sweatshirts. Participants respond as to whether faces are ‘old’ or ‘new’.

Cambridge Cars Memory Test (CCarMT) (Dennet et al., 2011). This 72-trial standardised short-term memory test has an identical structure to the short-version of the Cambridge Face Memory Test. It allows us to extract cars from face scores to generate an estimate of Non-Face Object Memory Ability. However, the ability to recognise cars is partly based on exposure and interest in cars. We ask a question around this, to ensure we can interpret the results appropriately. However, an aim for 2022-2023 is to create a series of three very different object memory tests. We think it unlikely anyone will be an expert on all four tests (including cars).


Appendix C: Links to tests

Fun test:


Could you be a Super-Recogniser Test


For participants who wish to sign up for future research.


The Three Test link is here (CFMT+, GFMT, STFMT3060): English German French


We always invite participants to take the Kent Face Matching Test and the Cambridge Cars Memory Test after completing the first battery.






Deutsche Version dieses Blogs


Die Informationen in diesem Blog waren am 15. Juli 2022 korrekt. Wir beabsichtigen, sie im September 2022 zu aktualisieren, indem wir die Ergebnisse des Cambridge Female Face Memory Test und des Glasgow Face Matching Test: Version 2: High 40 einbeziehen.


University of Greenwich Face and Voice Recognition Lab: Volunteer Participant Pool

Vielen Dank an die Mitglieder unseres Freiwilligenpools, die zu unserer Forschung beitragen. Wir wurden schon oft von Freiwilligen gefragt: "Was ist ein gutes Ergebnis bei diesen Tests?" und wir hoffen, dass dieser Blog dazu beiträgt, diese Frage zu beantworten.

Inhaltsübersicht

Freiwilligenpool

Aber wer meldet sich für einen Beitrag zu unserer Forschung?

Testergebnisse


· Cambridge Face Memory Test: Extended (n = 49,940)

· Glasgow Face Matching Test (n = 49,956)

· Kent Face Matching Test (n = 17,565)

· Old-New 30-60 Short-Term Face Memory Test (n = 27,491)

· Cambridge Cars Memory Test (n = 6,887)


Definition von Super Recognisern für Polizei- und Unternehmensprojekte

Können Bürgerinnen und Bürger die Gesichtserkennungstests durchführen, die wir für die Polizei verwenden?

Informationen zur Ethik

Anhang A: Could you be a super-recogniser Test (n = 1,000,000)

Anhang B: In diesem Blog beschriebene Tests

Anhang C: Hier können Sie freiwillig teilnehmen: URL-Links zu Tests



Freiwilligenpool

Der Freiwilligenpool des Face and Voice Recognition Lab der University of Greenwich wurde 2015 eingerichtet, als der Could you be a Super-Recogniser Test (siehe Davis, 2019) und der Glasgow Face Matching Test (GFMT; Burton et al., 2010) erstmals auf unsere Website hochgeladen wurden. Die Teilnehmenden konnten ihre E-Mail-Adresse hinterlassen, wenn sie an zukünftigen Studien interessiert waren, und sie gaben ihr Einverständnis, dass wir die Testergebnisse speichern durften.

Später wurde der Cambridge Face Memory Test: Extended (CFMT+; Russell et al., 2009) in die Testbatterie aufgenommen, gefolgt von dem Old/New 30-60 Short-Term Face Memory Test (STFMT3060, früher als Adult Face Memory Test bezeichnet: Robertson et al., 2019) im Jahr 2019, und schließlich der Kent Face Matching Test (KFMT; Fysh & Bindemann, 2018) im Jahr 2021.


Kürzlich wurden die Teilnehmenden auch gebeten, den Cambridge Cars Memory Test (CCarMT) (Dennett et al., 2011) durchzuführen, damit wir die Daten zu ihren Aufzeichnungen hinzufügen können, und dies ist der erste Blog, der über die ersten Ergebnisse berichtet. Wir haben die Teilnehmenden zusätzlich gefragt, ob wir die Ergebnisse anderer Tests (z. B. Stimmerkennungstests, Cambridge Female Face Memory Test und Glasgow Face Memory Test: Version 2) aufbewahren können. Allerdings hat nur eine Teilmenge der Teilnehmenden aus dem Pool der Freiwilligen diese Tests absolviert. Wir beabsichtigen, im September 2022 über erste Ergebnisse zu berichten und diesen Blog zu aktualisieren.


Über eine Million Teilnehmende aus der ganzen Welt haben innerhalb weniger Monate den Could you be a Super-Recogniser-Test absolviert (derzeit etwa 7 Millionen, siehe Anhang A), und wir haben bald festgestellt, dass diejenigen, die ihre Kontaktdaten für künftige Forschungseinladungen hinterlassen haben, in der Regel weitaus besser in der Gesichtserkennung sind, als man es von einer repräsentativen Stichprobe erwarten würde, die zufällig aus Mitgliedern der Öffentlichkeit gezogen wurde. Mit anderen Worten: Die Teilnehmenden an unseren Tests schneiden im Durchschnitt besser ab als die Allgemeinbevölkerung. Hier ist eindeutig eine Verzerrung durch Selbstselektion im Spiel.


Es ist sehr wahrscheinlich, dass Super-Recogniser (auch wenn sie in der Bevölkerung selten sind) weitaus häufiger als Nicht-Super-Recogniser freiwillig an unseren Untersuchungen teilnehmen.


Lassen Sie sich daher bitte nicht davon abhalten, an unseren Studien teilzunehmen, wenn Ihre Testergebnisse im Vergleich zu anderen enttäuschend ausfallen. Wenn wir Sie zu unserer Forschung einladen, sind wir für Ihren Beitrag immer sehr dankbar. Wir werden nie jemanden einladen, der für ein bestimmtes Projekt nicht in Frage kommt. Wir wollen Niemandes Zeit verschwenden.

Aber wer meldet sich, um einen Beitrag zu unserer Forschung zu leisten?


Zum Zeitpunkt der Erstellung dieses Berichts (17.07.2022) haben wir die Kontaktdaten von 49.954 Teilnehmenden. Früher waren es über 100.000, aber als 2018 die Datenschutzgrundverordnung eingeführt wurde, wurden alle per E-Mail angeschrieben, um zu prüfen, ob sie in der Datenbank bleiben möchten. Wenn wir keine Antwort erhielten, wurde ihr Datensatz gelöscht. Der Pool wurde auf etwa 38.000 reduziert und wächst seitdem weiter.


Nicht alle Freiwilligen haben jedoch alle von uns angeforderten demografischen Daten zur Verfügung gestellt, was zum Teil daran liegt, dass wir bei der Erstellung der Datenbank nicht immer gefragt haben, ob wir diese Daten speichern können (Alter = 43.383; Geschlecht = 43.545; ethnische Zugehörigkeit = 47.963; Land = 47.772; alle vier = 39.855). Die Reliabilität dieser Daten ist wichtig, da zahlreiche Forschungsergebnisse darauf hindeuten, dass diese Faktoren die Fähigkeit zur Gesichtserkennung und die Ergebnisse verschiedener Gesichtserkennungstests beeinflussen können. Die meisten Menschen sind sich des Cross-Ethnicity-Effekts bewusst (siehe z. B. Meissner & Brigham, 2001 für eine Übersicht), der besagt, dass Menschen dazu neigen, Gesichter ihrer eigenen Ethnie besser zu erkennen als Gesichter anderer Ethnien. Einige Untersuchungen haben ähnliche altersübergreifende (z. B. Anastasi & Rhodes, 2005) und geschlechtsübergreifende Effekte (z. B. Herlitz & Lovén, 2013) festgestellt. Es ist möglich, dass diese Effekte durch das Ausmaß des Kontakts mit Personen aus bestimmten Außengruppen bedingt sind (Meissner & Brigham, 2001). So kann beispielsweise eine Person, deren ethnische Zugehörigkeit ostasiatisch ist, die aber in Europa lebt, bei einem Test, der nur weiße Gesichter enthält, mit größerer Wahrscheinlichkeit bessere Ergebnisse erzielen als eine geschlechts- und altersgleiche Person, die in Ostasien lebt.


Gemeinsam mit Kolleginnen und Kollegen haben wir altersübergreifende (Belanova et al., 2018) und ethnienübergreifende Effekte (Carroll et al., 2021; Robertson et al., 2020) bei Super-Recognisern untersucht.

Standort: Tabelle 1 gibt einen Überblick darüber, wo die meisten Mitglieder des Pools nach eigenen Angaben wohnen (Beachten Sie, dass diese Daten vom Januar 2022 stammen). Da die University of Greenwich in London liegt, ist es nicht überraschend, dass über 20 % des Freiwilligenpools aus dem Vereinigten Königreich stammen. Der Anteil des Pools, der in anderen Ländern lebt, hängt wahrscheinlich von der Wirkung der Medienartikel über die Super-Recognition ab


Tabelle 1: Prozentualer Anteil der Teilnehmenden aus dem Freiwilligenpool aus den 30 wichtigsten Ländern



Was verloren gegangen ist, ist die Tatsache, dass der vierthöchste Anteil der Freiwilligen aus China stammte, bevor die Daten der Freiwilligen nach der Datenschutz-Grundverordnung gelöscht wurden. Heute gibt kaum ein Mitglied des Freiwilligenpools an, aus China zu stammen. Als anderes Extrem gaben bei der Gründung des Pools 17 Personen die Antarktis als ihre Heimat an. Einer schrieb per E-Mail, dass er auf einer wissenschaftlichen Basis am Südpol arbeite. Ein anderer Teilnehmer schrieb eine E-Mail von der Eiskappe im hohen Norden. Sie machten die Tests, während sie sich vor einem Sturm schützten. Während sie E-Mails schrieben, sagten sie, dass sie draußen einen Eisbären hören konnten.


Geschlecht und Alter: Über 38 % der Befragten bezeichnen sich als männlich, über 61 % als weiblich. Das Durchschnittsalter des Pools liegt mit etwa 39 Jahren weit über dem der typischen studentischen Teilnehmenden, die für die meisten Forschungsprojekte rekrutiert werden (Abbildung 1).


Abbildung 1: Altersverteilung des Freiwilligenpools




Ethnizität: Etwas beunruhigend ist für uns, dass die überwiegende Mehrheit der Mitglieder des Pools ihre ethnische Zugehörigkeit als weiß beschreibt (82.0%), was auf einen Mangel an Repräsentativität hindeutet. Obwohl diese Statistik dem Anteil der Weißen in England und Wales sehr ähnlich ist (86 %; Gov.uk, 2020), kommen unsere Teilnehmenden aus der ganzen Welt. Dies schränkt einige Schlussfolgerungen über unsere Forschung ein, da der Anteil der Weißen an der Weltbevölkerung deutlich geringer ist. Ein Grund dafür könnte die Tatsache sein, dass die in diesem Blog beschriebenen Tests nur weiße Gesichter enthalten. Möglicherweise schrecken wir damit unbeabsichtigt Menschen anderer Ethnien von der Teilnahme ab - dessen sind wir uns sehr bewusst. Wir verwenden Tests mit Gesichtern anderer Ethnien in unserer Forschung und in unseren Tests mit Polizeikräften und Unternehmen (siehe Beispiele hier und hier). Allerdings beschränken wir den Zugang zu diesen multiethnischen Gesichtserkennungstests auf den Einsatz in der Arbeitswelt, um sicherzustellen, dass niemand, der sie absolviert, einen Vorteil daraus zieht, dass er dieselben Tests bereits zuvor absolviert hat.


Warum enthalten diese Tests nur weiße Gesichter? Wir haben in einem früheren Blog darüber geschrieben, aber wenn wir Freiwillige bitten, neue Bilder von sich selbst für neue Gesichtserkennungstests zur Verfügung zu stellen, haben wir festgestellt, dass weiße Teilnehmende viel eher bereit sind, uns zu helfen. Dies ist vielleicht verständlich angesichts der regelmäßigen negativen Medienberichte über Fehler im Zusammenhang mit einigen computergestützten Gesichtsalgorithmus-Forschungen. Es ist auch ans Licht gekommen, dass bei einigen dieser Forschungen (nicht bei unseren) Gesichtsstimuli von Personen verwendet wurden, die nie ihr Einverständnis für eine solche Verwendung ihrer Bilder gegeben haben. Bei all unseren Forschungsarbeiten wollen wir zu 100 % sicher sein, dass alle abgebildeten Personen ihre informierte Zustimmung zur Verwendung der Bilder gegeben haben. Das geht so weit, dass wir es vorziehen, dass Teilnehmende, die an unseren Tests teilgenommen haben, Gesichtsbilder zur Verfügung stellen, da sie über den wahrscheinlichen Verwendungszweck ihrer Bilder angemessen informiert werden.


Der relative Mangel an geeigneten Bildern hat jedoch dazu geführt, dass wir bisher noch keine frei zugänglichen Tests im Internet erstellen konnten, die nicht-weiße Gesichter enthalten. Dies wollen wir mit dem London Face Memory Test erreichen. Ziel ist es, einen Test zu erstellen, der die vielfältige Bevölkerung Londons - eine der multikulturellsten Städte der Welt - annähernd repräsentiert. Die Mitglieder des Freiwilligenpools werden demnächst E-Mails zur Erstellung dieses Tests erhalten.


(Sie können uns gerne helfen, indem Sie Ihre Bilder HIER hochladen – Sie werden einen £5 Amazon Voucher erhalten).


Testergebnisse (siehe Anhang B für Testbeschreibungen, Anhang C für Links)

Da wir häufig E-Mails von Teilnehmenden erhalten, die sich fragen, wie ihre Ergebnisse im Vergleich zu denen anderer Teilnehmenden ausfallen, sind die Verteilungen der Testergebnisse für jeden der vier Haupttests, die von unserem Teilnehmerpool absolviert wurden, in den Abbildungen 2-5 dargestellt. Anhand dieser Abbildungen können Sie Ihre eigenen Ergebnisse mit denen anderer Teilnehmenden in der Datenbank vergleichen, um eine grobe Vorstellung davon zu bekommen, wie Sie Ihre Fähigkeiten in der Gesichtserkennung einschätzen können.


Weitaus zuverlässiger können Sie Ihre Ergebnisse auch mit den Ergebnissen vergleichen, die von der Allgemeinbevölkerung zu erwarten sind, da wir Linien (in grün) eingefügt haben, die den ungefähren Mittelwert darstellen, der von einer unserer Meinung nach repräsentativen Stichprobe der Allgemeinbevölkerung in drei der vier Tests erreicht wurde.


Wir haben auch zwei Linien eingefügt, die die Werte darstellen, die eine Standardabweichung (SD) über und eine SD unter dem Mittelwert aus diesen Stichproben liegen. Es ist davon auszugehen, dass etwa 68 % der Bevölkerung einen Wert innerhalb dieser beiden Linien (in rot) erreichen, während nur 16 % über der oberen Linie auf der rechten Seite jeder Abbildung liegen würden.


Abbildung 1: Cambridge Face Memory Test: Erweitert (CFMT+) Ergebnisse



Hinweis: CFMT+ “General public” Daten (n = 254) wurden in Bobak et al. (2016) berichtet)


Abbildung 2: Glasgow Face Matching Test (GFMT) Ergebnisse

https://superrecognisersinternational.com



Hinweis: GFMT “General public” Daten (n = 194) wurden in Burton et al. (2010) berichtet)


Abbildung 3: Kent Face Matching Test (KFMT) Ergebnisse


Hinweis: Die KFMT “General public” Daten wurden aus drei Artikeln zusammengestellt (Fysh, 2018; Fysh & Bindemann, 2018; Gentry & Bindemann, 2019).

Abbildung 4: Old/New 30-60 Short-Term Face Memory Test (STFMT3060) Ergebnisse



Abbildung 5: Cambridge Cars Memory Test (CCarMT) Ergebnisse



Definition von Super Recognisern für Polizei- und Unternehmensprojekte


Wir sind sicher, dass viele Leser und Leserinnen dieses Blogs herausfinden möchten, ob sie aufgrund ihrer Ergebnisse in diesen Tests als Super-Recogniser definiert werden können. Unsere Antwort lautet: Wenn Ihre Ergebnisse bei allen vier Tests im oberen Bereich liegen, ist die Wahrscheinlichkeit sehr groß, dass Sie ein Super-Recogniser sind. Wie bereits erwähnt, verwenden wir jedoch bei Polizei- und Unternehmensprojekten zusätzliche Tests mit unterschiedlichen Designs, die Gesichter verschiedener Ethnien und sogar unterschiedlichen Alters enthalten. Wir sind der Meinung, dass Super-Recogniser in der Lage sein müssen, in einer Vielzahl verschiedener Tests herausragende Ergebnisse zu erzielen, um aufgrund ihrer Fähigkeiten eine Anstellung zu erhalten. Die von uns verwendeten Tests messen vier Hauptkomponenten (siehe Davis, 2019, Davis, 2020). Drei dieser Komponenten sind das Kurzzeitgedächtnis für Gesichter (das auch mit dem CFMT+ und dem SFMT3060 gemessen wird), die simultane Zuordnung von Gesichtern (das auch mit dem GFMT und dem KFMT gemessen wird) und das Erkennen von Gesichtern in einer Menschenmenge (siehe Davis et al., 2018 für eine Beschreibung einer frühen Version dieses Tests).


Überlegenes Langzeit-Gesichtsgedächtnis: Das Markenzeichen der Super-Recognition

Die vierte Komponente jedoch, die Fähigkeit des Langzeit-Gesichtsgedächtnisses, repräsentiert möglicherweise am besten, wie Super-Recognition in den Köpfen der Super-Recogniser selbst wahrgenommen wird. Definitionen der Super-Recognition in den Medien und in Forschungsartikeln beziehen sich auch häufig auf die überragende Fähigkeit von Super-Recognisern, Menschen spontan und zuverlässig zu erkennen, auch nach Monaten oder sogar Jahrzehnten. In dieser Zeit wird sich das Aussehen dieser Personen verändert haben.


Auf dieser Grundlage wäre es schwer zu argumentieren, dass eine genaue Definition der Super Recognition darin bestehen sollte, dass "Super-Recogniser Personen sind, die über außerordentlich genaue Wahrnehmungs- und langfristige Fähigkeiten zur Verarbeitung von Gesichtsidentitäten verfügen"..


Wir haben ein Paper mit zwei Experimenten veröffentlicht, in der das Behalten von Gesichtern nur bis zu zwei Monate lang untersucht wurde (Davis et al., 2020). Viele Teilnehmende, die nur aufgrund ihrer CFMT+- und GFMT-Werte als Super-Recogniser eingestuft wurden, schnitten bei diesen Tests des Langzeit-Gesichtsgedächtnisses recht schlecht ab. Für ein schlechtes Abschneiden bei einem Gesichtserkennungstest kann es viele Gründe geben, die nichts mit der tatsächlichen Fähigkeit zu tun haben (z. B. Ablenkung, Krankheit, Schlafmangel, Internetstörungen). Diese Faktoren können sich umso stärker auswirken, je größer der Abstand zwischen Lern- und Testphase ist. Dennoch könnte man argumentieren, dass ein hochgradig überlegenes Langzeitgedächtnis für Gesichter das Markenzeichen der Super Recognition ist. Keiner der vier in diesem Blog beschriebenen Tests misst diese Fähigkeit. Daher sind wir natürlich vorsichtig damit, jemanden als Super-Recogniser zu zertifizieren, wenn er nicht alle Tests absolviert hat, die wir für die Polizei verwenden und von denen einige unter beaufsichtigten Prüfungsbedingungen durchgeführt werden sollten, um die Integrität der Testergebnisse sicherzustellen.


Soweit uns bekannt ist, gibt es weltweit keine andere Forschungsgruppe oder Polizeiorganisation, die Tests zur Messung des Gedächtnisses für Gesichter durchführt, die länger als ein paar Minuten dauern. Wir sind der Meinung, dass es ohne Tests dieser Art unmöglich ist, jemanden als Super-Recogniser zu bezeichnen.


Wir haben jedoch auch eine Reihe von Tests zum simultanen Abgleich von Gesichtern für Berufe in Unternehmen zusammengestellt, die nur überdurchschnittliche Fähigkeiten zum Vergleichen und Abgleichen von Gesichtern erfordern. Ein Gedächtnis für Gesichter ist nicht erforderlich. Jemand, der bei Tests, die diese Fähigkeit messen, zu den besten 2 % der Bevölkerung gehört, könnte am besten als "Super-Matcher" bezeichnet werden”.


Können Bürgerinnen und Bürger an den Gesichtserkennungstests teilnehmen, die wir bei der Polizei einsetzen?

Es ist möglich, dass Mitglieder der Allgemeinbevölkerung den gesamten Satz von Tests absolvieren (siehe Link unten)


Die University of Greenwich hat einen Forschungsberatungsvertrag mit Super-Recognisers International (https://superrecognisersinternational.com/), abgeschlossen, die die Durchführung der Tests organisieren können. Diejenigen, die unsere Super-Recogniser-Kriterien für alle vier Komponenten (Ergebnisse, die von den besten 2 % der Bevölkerung erwartet werden) oder unsere Super-Matcher-Kriterien (Ergebnisse, die von den besten 2 % der Bevölkerung nur bei den Tests zur simultanen Gesichtszuordnung erwartet werden) erreichen, können zusätzlich Lizenznehmer der Association of Super-Recognisers (https://www.associationofsuperrecognisers.org/) werden. Für diejenigen, die die Standards erreichen, werden Zertifikate ausgestellt.


Super-Recognisers International erhebt für diese Dienstleistung jedoch Gebühren. Es gibt zwei Stufen.


1. Online Tests: Den Link zu den Online-Tests und aktuelle Informationen über die Kosten für die Teilnahme an diesen Tests finden Sie HIER. Diese Tests messen das Kurzzeit-Gesichtsgedächtnis, das simultane Zuordnen von Gesichtern und das Langzeit-Gesichtsgedächtnis. Einige der Tests, über die in diesem Blog berichtet wird, sind zu Forschungszwecken in der Testbatterie enthalten. Sie müssen nicht erneut durchgeführt werden. Frühere Ergebnisse können manuell eingegeben werden, sofern die Teilnehmenden dieselbe E-Mail-Adresse verwenden, die in der Datenbank des Freiwilligenpools zur Überprüfung angegeben ist. Wenn sich jemand zur Teilnahme an den Tests entschließt, werden die Ergebnisse von der University of Greenwich an Super-Recognisers International übermittelt. Die Ergebnisse werden nur dann freigegeben, wenn der Teilnehmende die geforderten Beträge bezahlt. Die University of Greenwich ist nicht an der Zahlung oder an Vereinbarungen zwischen dem Teilnehmenden und Super-Recognisers International beteiligt.


2. Die prüfungsbegleitenden, beaufsichtigten Tests: Diese Tests werden in der Regel in 3-4-tägige Online- oder Live-Schulungen integriert, die einen umfassenderen Einblick in rechtliche und technische Fragen im Zusammenhang mit Berufen geben, in denen hervorragende Fähigkeiten zur Gesichtserkennung wichtig sind. Die Tests messen das Erkennen von Gesichtern in einer Menschenmenge und ermöglichen es uns aufgrund der beaufsichtigten Verfahren, den Besitz von überragenden Fähigkeiten im Bereich des Kurzzeit-Gesichtsgedächtnisses und der simultanen Gesichtszuordnung zu bestätigen. Einige Lizenznehmende haben sich aufgrund ihrer Testergebnisse einen Arbeitsplatz gesichert, und daher müssen alle Beteiligten sicher sein, dass die hohen Ergebnisse unter zuverlässigen Bedingungen erzielt wurden. Es ist jedoch mit erheblichen Kosten verbunden, Tests durchzuführen, die teilweise unter Prüfungsbedingungen durchgeführt werden, bei denen entweder jemand im Raum anwesend ist oder den Fortschritt aus der Ferne überwacht.


Aufgrund der Kosten, die mit der Teilnahme an diesen Tests verbunden sind, empfehlen wir den Teilnehmenden, sich vor der Teilnahme an diesen Tests zu vergewissern, dass sie tatsächlich überdurchschnittliche Fähigkeiten besitzen. Diejenigen, deren Ergebnisse im Vergleich zu den anderen in den Histogrammen in den Abbildungen 1 bis 4 im höchsten Bereich liegen, sollten dies gut verstehen und werden die geforderten Standards am ehesten erreichen. Es kann jedoch nicht garantiert werden, dass selbst die besten Teilnehmenden an den öffentlich zugänglichen Tests die abschließende Prüfungsphase bestehen werden. Etwa 10 % der Teilnehmenden an den Prüfungen erreichen die Kriterien nicht, obwohl ihre Punktzahl höher ist als die der überwiegenden Mehrheit der Bevölkerung (wir bieten immer die Möglichkeit, die Prüfungen zu wiederholen), während weitere 10-20 % den Status eines Super-Matchers erreichen. Die University of Greenwich ist nicht in der Lage, auf der Grundlage früherer Leistungen Vorhersagen über das Abschneiden bei künftigen Prüfungen zu treffen.


Eine Publikation über die Ergebnisse dieser Zusammenarbeit wird derzeit vorbereitet. Dies hat länger gedauert als erwartet, da das Labor mit Polizeiprojekten in den Jahren 2021 und 2022 außerordentlich beschäftigt war. Man hofft, dass sie 2023 veröffentlicht werden kann.

Ethik im Zusammenhang mit unserer Freiwilligenpool-Datenbank


Alle Teilnehmenden geben ihr Einverständnis, dass ihre Daten gespeichert werden. In einem zweiten Speicher werden auch die E-Mail-Adressen der Teilnehmenden gespeichert, damit sie weiterhin zur Teilnahme an künftigen Forschungsarbeiten eingeladen werden können. Als die EU-Datenschutzgrundverordnung (GDPR) 2018 in Kraft trat, wurden alle Teilnehmende erneut per E-Mail über die Speicherung ihrer Daten informiert. Erfolgte keine Rückmeldung, wurden die entsprechenden Daten gelöscht. Diejenigen Teilnehmenden, die sich seitdem für die Teilnahme an den Tests entscheiden, erhalten umgehend die Informationen zur GDPR und zur Möglichkeit, ihre Einwilligung jederzeit zu widerrufen.


Weitere Informationen über unsere ethischen und datenschutzrechtlichen Verfahren finden Sie hier.

Referenzen


Anastasi, J. S., & Rhodes, M. G. (2005). An own-age bias in face recognition for children and older adults. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 12, 1043-1047. DOI: 10.3758/BF03206441


Belanova, E., Davis, J. P., & Thompson, T. (2018). Cognitive and neural markers of super-recognisers' face processing superiority and enhanced cross-age effect. Cortex, 98, 91-101. DOI:10.1016/j.cortex.2018.07.008 (Download pre-print here: https://bit.ly/bdtb2018)

Bobak, A. K., Pampoulov, P., & Bate, S. (2016). Detecting superior face recognition skills in a large sample of young British adults. Frontiers in Psychology, 7(1378). https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01378

Burton, A. M., White, D., & McNeill, A. (2010). The Glasgow face matching test. Behavior Research Methods, 42(1), 286-291. DOI:10.3758/BRM.42.1.286


Correll, J., Ma., D. S., & Davis, J. P. (2020). Perceptual tuning through contact? Contact interacts with perceptual (not memory-based) face-processing ability to predict cross-race recognition. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 92, 104058, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jesp.2020.104058

Davis, J. P. (2020). CCTV and the super-recognisers. In C. Stott, B. Bradford, M. Radburn, and L. Savigar-Shaw (Eds.), Making an Impact on Policing and Crime: Psychological Research, Policy and Practice (pp 34-67). London: Routledge. ISBN 9780815353577. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780429326592 (Download free pre-print here: https://bit.ly/34Phwjm)

Davis, J. P., Bretfelean, D., Belanova, E., & Thompson, T. (2020). Super-recognisers: face recognition performance after variable delay intervals. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 34(6), 1350-1368. DOI:10.1002/acp.3712 (Download free pre-print here: https://bit.ly/3slkg0m)


Davis, J. P., Treml. F., Forrest, C., & Jansari, A (2018). Identification from CCTV: Assessing police super recognisers ability to spot faces in a crowd and susceptibility to change blindness. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 32(3), 337-353. DOI: 10.1002/acp.3405 (Download pre-print here: https://bit.ly/3dtfj2018


Dennett, H. W., McKone, E., Tavashmi, R., Hall, A., Pidcock, M., Edwards, M., & Duchaine, B. (2011). The Cambridge Car Memory Test: A task matched in format to the Cambridge Face Memory Test, with norms, reliability, sex differences, dissociations from face memory, and expertise effects. Behavior Research Methods, 44(2), 587–605. https://doi.org/10.3758/s13428-011-0160-2


Fysh, M. C. (2018). Individual differences in the detection, matching and memory of faces. Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications, 3(1), 1-12.


Fysh, M. C., & Bindemann, M. (2018). The Kent face matching test. British Journal of Psychology, 109(2), 219-231.


Gentry, N. W., & Bindemann, M. (2019). Examples improve facial identity comparison. Journal of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition, 8(3), 376-385.

Gov.uk (2020). Population of England and Wales. Downloaded 20 November 2021 from, https://www.ethnicity-facts-figures.service.gov.uk/uk-population-by-ethnicity/national-and-regional-populations/population-of-england-and-wales/latest


Herlitz, A., & Lovén, J. (2013). Sex differences and the own-gender bias in face recognition: A meta-analytic review. Visual Cognition, 21(9-10), 1306-1336. https://doi.org/10.1080/13506285.2013.823140


Meissner, C. A., & Brigham, J. C. (2001). Thirty years of investigating the own-race bias in memory for faces: A meta-analytic review. Psychology, Public Policy, and Law, 7(1), 3-35. https://doi.org/10.1037/1076-8971.7.1.3


Robertson, D., Black, J., Chamberlain, B., Megreya, A. M., & Davis, J. P. (2020). Super-recognisers show an advantage for other race face identification. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 34(1), 205-216. DOI: 10.1002/acp.3608 (Download free pre-print here: https://bit.ly/rbcmd2020)


Russell, R., Duchaine, B., & Nakayama, K. (2009). Super-recognizers: People with extraordinary face recognition ability. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 16(2), 252–257. https://doi.org/10.3758/PBR.16.2.252


Anhang A: Could you be a super-recogniser Test


Mit diesem unterhaltsamen Test wird die Fähigkeit gemessen, sich ein Gesicht zu merken und dieses Gesicht kurz darauf aus einem manchmal anderen Blickwinkel unter einer Reihe sehr ähnlicher Gesichter zu erkennen. Er besteht aus 14 Durchgängen, bei denen ein einzelnes Schwarz-Weiß-Gesichtsbild für 5 Sekunden aus einer Frontal-, 30-Grad- oder Profilansicht gezeigt wird und unmittelbar darauf eine Reihe von 6 oder 8 Gesichtern folgt. Die Teilnehmenden werden im Voraus gewarnt, dass die Zielperson in allen Durchgängen anwesend ist. Insgesamt haben 7 Millionen Teilnehmende an diesem Test teilgenommen.


Abbildung 1: Häufigkeiten der Gesamtscores (von 14) der ersten eine Millionen Teilnehmenden des 14-Durchgänge Test: Could you be a Super-Recogniser? (M = 9.64, SD = 1.90) (Davis, 2019)


Anhang B: In diesem Blog beschriebene Tests


Cambridge Face Memory Test: Extended (CFMT+) (Russell et al., 2009). Dieser standardisierte Kurzzeit-Gesichtsgedächtnistest mit 102 Durchgängen ist wahrscheinlich der weltweit am häufigsten verwendete Test zur Gesichtserkennung, obwohl er ursprünglich nicht zur Messung der Super-Recognition konzipiert wurde. Aufgrund von Anomalien wie z. B. der Tatsache, dass die Gesichter hauptsächlich ohne Haare abgebildet sind, und dass der Test seit mehreren Jahren im Internet zum Üben zur Verfügung steht, wäre es unklug, jemanden allein aufgrund der Ergebnisse dieses Tests als Super-Recogniser bei der Polizei zu bezeichnen. Der Mittelwert dieses Tests liegt in den meisten Untersuchungen bei etwa 70 von 102 Punkten (SD = 10), und Werte von 90-95 von 102 Punkten wurden in früheren Untersuchungen zur Diagnose der Super-Recognition verwendet, was 2 SD über dem Kontrollmittelwert entspricht, ein Wert, der wahrscheinlich von etwa 2 % der Bevölkerung erreicht wird.


Glasgow Face Matching Test (GFMT) (Burton et al., 2010). Dieser Test mit 40 Durchgängen misst die Fähigkeit, zwischen zwei sehr ähnlich aussehenden Gesichtsbildern weißer Ethnien zu unterscheiden. Er beruht nicht auf dem Gedächtnis. Die Teilnehmenden entscheiden, ob 40 Paare von Gesichtsfotos dieselbe Person darstellen oder nicht. Bei der Hälfte der Versuche handelt es sich um "übereinstimmende" (d. h. dieselbe Person ist auf dem Paar abgebildet), bei der anderen Hälfte um nicht übereinstimmende Durchgänge. Die Teilnehmenden werden im Voraus vor dem zufällig angeordneten, aber gleichen Verhältnis von übereinstimmenden und nicht übereinstimmenden Durchgängen gewarnt. Dieser Test eignet sich möglicherweise nicht für die "Diagnose" von Super-Recognisern, da er unter Deckeneffekten leidet. Viele Teilnehmende erreichen 100 %.


The Kent Face Matching Test (KFMT) (Fysh & Bindemann, 2018). Dieser Test mit 40 Durchgängen misst die Fähigkeit, zwischen zwei sehr ähnlich aussehenden Gesichtsbildern weißer Ethnien zu unterscheiden. Er beruht nicht auf dem Gedächtnis. Die Teilnehmenden entscheiden, ob 40 Paare hochwertiger Gesichtsfotos dieselbe Person darstellen oder nicht. Bei der Hälfte der Versuche handelt es sich um "übereinstimmende" (d. h. dieselbe Person ist auf dem Paar abgebildet), bei der anderen Hälfte um nicht übereinstimmende Durchgänge. Die Teilnehmenden werden im Voraus vor dem zufällig angeordneten, aber gleichen Verhältnis von übereinstimmenden und nicht übereinstimmenden Durchgängen gewarnt.


Short-Term Face Memory Test 30-60 (STFMT3060). Dieser Test mit 60 Durchgängen misst das Kurzzeitgedächtnis für unbekannte ethnische Gesichter in Schwarz-Weiß. In der Lernphase dieses Tests werden nacheinander 30 männliche Gesichter in identischen lila Sweatshirts für 10 Sekunden präsentiert. In der Testphase werden neue Fotos der 30 "alten" Gesichter nach dem Zufallsprinzip mit 30 "neuen" Gesichtern gemischt, die verschiedene Sweatshirts tragen. Die Teilnehmenden reagieren darauf, ob die Gesichter "alt" oder "neu" sind.

Cambridge Cars Memory Test (CCarMT) (Dennet et al., 2011). Dieser standardisierte Kurzzeitgedächtnistest mit 72 Versuchen hat eine identische Struktur wie die Kurzversion des Cambridge Face Memory Test. Er ermöglicht es uns, Autos aus den Ergebnissen zu Gesichtern zu extrahieren, um eine Schätzung der Nicht-Gesicht Objekt Gedächtnis Fähigkeit (Non-Face Object Memory Ability) zu erhalten. Die Fähigkeit, Autos zu erkennen, basiert jedoch zum Teil auf der Erfahrung und dem Interesse an Autos. Wir stellen dazu eine Frage, um sicherzustellen, dass wir die Ergebnisse angemessen interpretieren können. Ein Ziel für 2022-2023 ist es jedoch, eine Serie von drei sehr unterschiedlichen Objektgedächtnistests zu erstellen. Wir halten es für unwahrscheinlich, dass jemand in allen vier Tests (einschließlich Autos) ein Experte sein wird.


Anhang C: Links zu den Tests

Spaß-Test


Could you be a Super-Recogniser Test


Für Teilnehmende, die sich gerne für zukünftige Forschung eintragen würden.


Der Drei Tests Link ist hier (CFMT+, GFMT, STFMT3060): Englisch Deutsch Französisch


Wir laden Teilnehmende immer dazu ein, den Kent Face Matching Test und den Cambridge Cars Memory Test durchzuführen, nachdem sie die erste Batterie absolviert haben.





Version française de ce blog


Les informations contenues dans ce blog étaient correctes au 15 juillet 2022. Nous avons l'intention de mettre à jour en septembre 2022, en incluant les scores du Cambridge Female Face Memory Test et du Glasgow Face Matching Test: Version 2: High 40


Laboratoire de reconnaissance faciale et vocale de l'Université de Greenwich Groupe de participants bénévoles


Merci aux membres de notre groupe de volontaires qui contribuent à nos recherches. Les volontaires nous ont demandé à de nombreuses reprises "quel est un bon score à ces tests?" et nous espérons que ce blog contribuera à répondre à cette question.

Table des matières

Groupe de participants volontaires

Mais qui s'inscrit pour contribuer à nos recherches ?

Résultats des tests


· Cambridge Face Memory Test: Étendu (n = 49,940)

· Glasgow Face Matching Test (n = 49,956)

· Kent Face Matching Test (n = 17,565)

· Old-New 30-60 Short-Term Face Memory Test (n = 27,491)

· Cambridge Cars Memory Test (n = 6,887)


Définir les super-reconnaisseurs pour les projets de police et des entreprises

Les membres du public peuvent-ils passer les tests de reconnaissance faciale que nous utilisons avec la police ?

Informations sur l'éthique

Annexe A : Could you be a super-recogniser test ( Test « Pourriez-vous être un super-reconnaisseur ») (n = 1.000.000)

Annexe B : Tests décrits dans ce blog

Annexe C : Portez-vous volontaire ici : Liens URL vers les tests



Liste des participants volontaires


Le groupe de participants volontaires du Laboratoire de reconnaissance faciale et vocale de l'Université de Greenwich a été créé en 2015, lorsque le test Could you be a Super-Recogniser (voir Davis, 2019) et le Glasgow Face Matching Test (GFMT ; Burton et al., 2010) ont été téléchargés pour la première fois sur notre site Web. Les participants pouvaient laisser leur courriel s'ils étaient intéressés à participer à de futures recherches et ils ont donné leur consentement pour que nous conservions les scores des tests.

Plus tard, le Cambridge Face Memory Test : Étendu (CFMT+ ; Russell et al., 2009) a été ajouté à la batterie de tests, suivi du Short-Term Face Memory Test 30-60 (STFMT3060, à une époque décrit comme l'Adult Face Memory Test : Robertson et al., 2019), puis le Kent Face Matching Test (KFMT ; Fysh & Bindemann, 2018) en 2021.


Récemment, nous avons également demandé aux participants de passer le Cambridge Cars Memory Test (CCarMT) (Dennett et al., 2011) pour que nous puissions ajouter les données à leurs dossiers, et ce blog est le premier à rapporter les premiers résultats. Nous avons également demandé aux participants si nous pouvions conserver les scores d'autres tests (par exemple, les tests de reconnaissance vocale, le Cambridge Female Face Memory Test et le Glasgow Face Memory Test : Version 2). Cependant, seul un sous-ensemble de participants du groupe de volontaires a passé ces tests. Nous avons l'intention de communiquer les premiers résultats en septembre 2022 en mettant à jour ce blog.


Plus d'un million de participants du monde entier ont rempli le test "Could you be a Super-Recogniser" quelques mois après sa publication (environ 7 millions aujourd'hui, voir l'annexe A), et nous avons rapidement constaté que ceux qui ont laissé leurs coordonnées pour de futures invitations à des recherches avaient tendance à être bien meilleurs en reconnaissance de visages que ce que l'on pourrait attendre d'un échantillon représentatif tiré au hasard parmi les membres du public. En d'autres termes, les participants qui prennent part à nos tests ont tendance à obtenir des résultats plus élevés que ceux que l'on pourrait attendre d'un échantillon représentatif de la population générale. Il est clair qu'un biais d'auto-sélection est à l'œuvre.


Il est fort probable que les super-reconnaisseurs (même s'ils sont rares dans la population) soient beaucoup plus susceptibles que les non super-reconnaisseurs de se porter volontaires pour passer nos tests.


Pour cette raison, ne soyez pas dissuade(e) de contribuer à notre recherche si les résultats de votre test semblent décevants par rapport à d'autres. Si nous vous invitons à participer à nos recherches, nous vous serons toujours très reconnaissants de votre contribution. Nous n'inviterons jamais une personne qui n'est pas éligible pour un projet spécifique. Nous ne souhaitons pas faire perdre de temps à qui que ce soit.

Mais qui s'inscrit pour contribuer à nos recherches ?


À l'heure où nous écrivons ces lignes (17.07.2022), nous disposons des coordonnées de 49 954 participants. À une certaine époque, il y en avait plus de 100 000, mais lorsque le GDPR a été introduit en 2018, tous ont été envoyés par courriel pour vérifier qu'ils souhaitaient rester dans la base de données. En l'absence de réponse, leur dossier a été supprimé. Le groupe a été réduit à environ 38 000 et il n'a cessé de croître depuis.


Tous les volontaires n'ont cependant pas fourni l'ensemble des données démographiques que nous demandons, en partie parce que lors de la création de la base de données, nous n'avons pas toujours demandé si nous pouvions stocker ces données (âge = 43 383 ; sexe = 43 545 ; ethnicité = 47 963 ; pays = 47 772 ; les quatre = 39 855). La fiabilité de ces données est importante, car de nombreuses recherches suggèrent que ces facteurs peuvent avoir un impact sur la capacité de reconnaissance des visages et sur les scores obtenus à différents tests de reconnaissance des visages.

La plupart des individus sont conscients de l'effet interethnique (voir par exemple Meissner & Brigham, 2001 pour une revue), c'est-à-dire que les personnes ont tendance à mieux reconnaître les visages de leur propre ethnie que ceux des autres ethnies. Certaines recherches ont trouvé des effets similaires entre les âges (par exemple, Anastasi & Rhodes, 2005) et entre les sexes (par exemple, Herlitz & Lovén, 2013). Il est possible que ces effets soient déterminés par les niveaux de contact avec des personnes appartenant à des groupes extéries spécifiques (Meissner et Brigham, 2001). Par exemple, une personne dont l'origine ethnique est l'Asie de l'Est, mais qui vit en Europe, peut-être plus susceptible d'obtenir un score plus élevé à un test comprenant uniquement des visages blancs, qu'une personne du même sexe et du même âge qui vit en Asie de l'Est.


Avec des collaborateurs, nous avons étudié les effets inter-âges (Belanova et al., 2018) et inter-ethniques (Carroll et al., 2021 ; Robertson et al., 2020) chez les super-reconnaisseurs.


Localisation : Le tableau 1 donne une indication de l'endroit où la plupart des membres du groupe prétendent vivre (notez que ces données sont de janvier 2022). Comme l'Université de Greenwich est située à Londres, il n'est pas surprenant que plus de 20 % des volontaires soient originaires du Royaume-Uni. La proportion du pool située dans d'autres pays dépend probablement de l'impact des articles de presse sur la super-reconnaissance.


Tableau 1 : Pourcentage du groupe de volontaires provenant des 30 premiers pays




Ce que l'on a perdu de vue, c'est qu'avant le dégagement consécutif à l'introduction du GDPR, la quatrième plus grande proportion provenait de Chine. Aujourd'hui, pratiquement aucun membre du groupe de volontaires ne se réclame de la Chine. À l'opposé, lorsque le groupe a été créé, 17 personnes ont déclaré être originaires de l'Antarctique. L'un d'eux a envoyé un courriel pour dire qu'il travaillait sur une base scientifique au pôle Sud. D'autre part, un autre participant a envoyé un courriel depuis la calotte glaciaire du Grand Nord. Ils ont passé les tests en s'abritant d'une tempête. Pendant qu'ils envoyaient le courriel, ils ont dit qu'ils pouvaient entendre un ours polaire à l'extérieur.


Sexe et âge : Plus de 38% des répondants se décrivent comme des hommes, plus de 61% comme des femmes. L'âge moyen du groupe, qui est d'environ 39 ans, est bien plus élevé que celui des participants étudiants typiques recrutés dans la plupart des recherches (Figure 1).


Figure 1 : Répartition par âge des volontaires



Ethnicité : Ce qui est légèrement inquiétant pour nous, car cela démontre un manque de représentativité, c'est que la grande majorité des membres de la réserve décrivent leur ethnie comme étant blanche (82,0%). Bien que cette statistique soit similaire à la proportion de personnes blanches en Angleterre et au Pays de Galles (86% ; Gov.uk, 2020), nos participants viennent du monde entier. Cela limitera certaines conclusions que nous pouvons tirer de nos résultats, car la proportion de Blancs dans la population mondiale est clairement plus faible. L'une des raisons peut être liée au fait que les tests décrits dans ce blog ne contiennent que des visages blancs. Il se peut que nous dissuadions par inadvertance les personnes d'autres ethnies de contribuer - nous en sommes très conscients. Nous utilisons des tests contenant des visages d'autres ethnies dans nos recherches et dans nos tests avec les forces de police et les entreprises (voir les exemples ici et ici). Cependant, nous limitons l'accès à ces tests de reconnaissance faciale multiethniques à des fins d'affectation, afin de garantir que les personnes qui les passent n'ont pas l'avantage d'avoir déjà passé les mêmes tests auparavant.


Pourquoi ces tests ne contiennent-ils que des visages blancs ? Nous avons écrit un précédent blog à ce sujet, mais lorsque nous demandons à des volontaires de fournir de nouvelles images d'eux-mêmes pour les nouveaux tests de reconnaissance faciale, nous avons constaté que les participants blancs sont beaucoup plus susceptibles de nous aider. Cela est peut-être compréhensible étant donné les rapports négatifs réguliers des médias sur les erreurs associées à certaines recherches sur les algorithmes de visage informatisés. Il est également apparu que certaines de ces recherches (pas les nôtres) ont utilisé des stimuli faciaux de personnes qui n'ont jamais donné leur accord pour que leurs images soient utilisées de cette manière. Pour notre recherche, nous voulons être sûrs à 100% que toutes les personnes représentées ont donné leur consentement éclairé pour l'utilisation de leurs images. À tel point que nous préférons que les participants qui ont passé nos tests fournissent des images faciales, car ils seront correctement informés de la finalité probable de l'utilisation de leurs images.


Néanmoins, le manque relatif d'images appropriées signifie que nous n'avons pas encore été en mesure de créer des tests librement disponibles sur Internet contenant des visages non-blancs. Nous avons l'intention de le faire en créant le London Face Memory Test. L'objectif est de créer un test qui représente à peu près la diversité de la population de Londres, l'une des villes les plus multiculturelles du monde. Les membres du groupe de volontaires recevront bientôt des courriels concernant la création de ce test.


(Vous êtes invités à nous aider en téléchargeant vos images ICI - vous recevrez un bon Amazon de 5 £).


Résultats du test (voir l'annexe B pour la description des tests, l'annexe C pour les liens)

Comme nous recevons souvent des courriels de participants se demandant comment leurs scores se comparent à ceux des autres participants, les distributions des scores pour chacun des quatre principaux tests passés par notre groupe de participants sont présentées dans les figures 2 à 5. À partir de celles-ci, vous devriez être en mesure de comparer vos propres scores à ceux des autres participants de la base de données afin d'obtenir une idée très approximative de l'évaluation de vos compétences en matière de reconnaissance des visages.


En effet, nous avons superposé des lignes (en vert) représentant le score moyen approximatif obtenu par ce que nous pensons être l'échantillon le plus représentatif de membres du public pour trois des quatre tests.


Nous avons également inclus deux lignes représentant les valeurs situées à un écart-type ( SD) au-dessus et un SD au-dessous de la moyenne de ces échantillons. Environ 68% de la population devrait obtenir un score compris entre ces deux lignes (en rouge), alors qu'à l'inverse, seuls 16% devraient obtenir un score supérieur à la ligne supérieure à droite de chaque figure.


Figure 1 : Test de mémoire des visages de Cambridge : Scores étendus (CFMT+)



Remarque : les données du CFMT+ « General public » (n = 254) ont été rapportées par Bobak et al. (2016).


Figure 2 : Résultats du Glasgow Face Matching Test (GFMT)

https://superrecognisersinternational.com


Remarque : les données du GFMT " general public " (n = 194) ont été rapportées par Burton et al. (2010).


Figure 3 : Résultats du Kent Face Matching Test (KFMT)


Remarque : les données du KFMT " General public " ont été compilées à partir de trois articles (Fysh, 2018 ; Fysh & Bindemann, 2018 ; Gentry & Bindemann, 2019).


Figure 4 : Short-Term Face Memory Test 30-60 (STFMT3060)



Figure 5 : Résultats du Cambridge Cars Memory Test (CCarMT)


Définir les super-reconnaisseurs pour les projets de la police et des entreprise


Nous sommes certains que de nombreuses personnes lisant ce blog espèrent savoir si elles peuvent être définies comme des super-reconnaisseurs sur la base de leurs résultats à ces tests. Notre réponse est que si vos scores se situent dans la fourchette haute des quatre tests, il y a une très forte probabilité que vous soyez un super-reconnaisseur. Toutefois, comme nous l'avons indiqué, dans le cadre des projets de la police et des entreprises, nous utilisons des tests supplémentaires avec des modèles différents qui contiennent des visages d'ethnies différentes, voire d'âges différents. Nous pensons que pour se voir offrir un emploi basé sur leurs compétences, les super-reconnaisseurs doivent être capables d'obtenir des scores exceptionnels dans un large éventail de tests différents. Les tests que nous utilisons mesurent quatre composantes principales (voir Davis, 2019, Davis, 2020). Trois de ces composantes sont la mémoire des visages à court terme (également mesurée à l'aide du CFMT+ et du STFMT3060), la comparaison simultanée de visages (également mesurée à l'aide du GFMT et du KFMT) et le repérage de visages dans une foule (voir Davis et al., 2018 pour une description d'une première version de ce test).


Mémoire supérieure des visages à long terme : La marque de fabrique de la super-reconnaissance

The fourth component, however, long-term face memory ability, may best represent how super-recognition is perceived in the minds of super-recognisers themselves. Definitions of super-recognition in the media and in research articles also often refer to super-recogniser’s superior ability to recognise people spontaneously and reliably after delays of months or even decades. In that time the appearance of those people will have changed.


La quatrième composante, cependant, la capacité de mémoire à long terme des visages, représente peut-être le mieux la façon dont la super-reconnaissance est perçue dans l'esprit des super-reconnaisseurs eux-mêmes. Les définitions de la super-reconnaissance dans les médias et dans les articles de recherche font souvent référence à la capacité supérieure des super-reconnaisseurs à reconnaître les personnes de manière spontanée et fiable après des délais de plusieurs mois, voire de plusieurs décennies. Pendant ce temps, l'apparence de ces personnes aura changé.


Sur cette base, il serait difficile de soutenir qu'une définition précise de la super-reconnaissance devrait être que "les super-reconnaisseurs sont des individus qui possèdent des capacités de perception et de traitement de l'identité des visages extraordinairement précises à long terme".


Nous avons publié un article de deux expériences examinant la rétention de la mémoire des visages jusqu'à deux mois seulement (Davis et al., 2020). De nombreux participants classés comme super-reconnaisseurs sur la base de leurs scores CFMT+ et GFMT uniquement, ont obtenu des résultats assez médiocres lors de ces tests de mémoire des visages à long terme. Il peut y avoir de nombreuses raisons à une mauvaise performance à un test de reconnaissance des visages qui n'ont aucun rapport avec la capacité réelle (par exemple, les distractions, la maladie, le manque de sommeil, les perturbations d'Internet). Ces facteurs peuvent avoir un impact plus important à mesure que l'écart entre les phases d'apprentissage et de test se creuse. Néanmoins, on peut affirmer qu'une mémoire des visages à long terme très supérieure est la marque de la super-reconnaissance. Aucun des quatre tests décrits dans ce blog ne mesure cette compétence. Par conséquent, nous hésitons naturellement à certifier qu'une personne est capable de super-reconnaissance à moins qu'elle n'ait passé l'ensemble des tests que nous utilisons pour la police, dont certains doivent être passés dans des conditions d'examen surveillées, afin de garantir l'intégrité des résultats.


À notre connaissance, aucun autre groupe de recherche dans le monde ou organisation policière n'inclut des tests de mémoire des visages qui mesurent la mémoire des visages pendant plus de quelques minutes. Nous soutenons que sans ce type de tests, il est impossible de décrire une personne comme un super-reconnaisseur.


Néanmoins, nous avons également compilé une batterie de tests de comparaison simultanée de visages pour des postes dans des organisations qui ne requièrent que des compétences supérieures de comparaison/mise en correspondance de visages. La mémoire des visages n'est pas requise. Les personnes qui obtiennent des résultats dans les 2 % supérieurs de la population aux tests mesurant cette compétence pourraient être décrites comme des "super-matchers".


Les membres du public peuvent-ils passer les tests de reconnaissance faciale que nous utilisons avec la police ?


Il est possible pour les membres du public de passer l'ensemble des tests (voir le lien ci-dessous).


L'Université de Greenwich a un contrat de conseil en recherche avec Super-Recognisers International (https://superrecognisersinternational.com/), qui peut organiser l'administration des tests. Ceux qui répondent à nos critères de Super-Recogniser pour les quatre composantes (scores attendus par environ les 2% supérieurs de la population), ou à nos critères de Super-Matcher (scores attendus par environ les 2% supérieurs de la population sur les tests d'appariement simultané des visages uniquement) peuvent en outre devenir licenciés de l'Association des Super-Recognisers (https://www.associationofsuperrecognisers.org/). Des certificats sont délivrés à ceux qui atteignent les normes.


Cependant, Super-Recognisers International fait payer ce service. Il y a deux étapes.


1. Tests en ligne : Le lien vers les tests en ligne et les informations actualisées sur les coûts de ces tests se trouvent ICI. Ces tests mesurent la mémoire à court terme des visages, la comparaison simultanée des visages et la mémoire à long terme des visages. Certains des tests présentés dans ce blog sont inclus dans la batterie à des fins de recherche. Il n'est pas nécessaire de les repasser. Les scores précédents peuvent être saisis manuellement, à condition que les participants utilisent la même adresse électronique que celle figurant dans la base de données du pool de volontaires pour la vérification. Si une personne choisit de passer les tests, ses scores seront envoyés par l'Université de Greenwich à Super-Recognisers International. Les scores ne seront divulgués que si le participant paie les fonds requis. L'Université de Greenwich n'est pas impliquée dans le paiement ni dans les accords entre le participant et Super-Recognisers International.


2. Les tests administrés par examen et surveillés : Ces tests sont normalement intégrés dans des cours de formation en ligne ou en direct de 3 à 4 jours qui donnent un aperçu plus large des questions juridiques et techniques associées aux emplois dans lesquels des compétences supérieures en matière de reconnaissance des visages sont importantes. Les tests mesurent la capacité à repérer des visages dans une foule et, en raison des procédures surveillées, nous permettent de confirmer la possession de compétences supérieures en matière de mémoire à court terme des visages et de comparaison simultanée des visages. Certains licenciés ont obtenu des emplois sur la base de leurs résultats aux tests, et toutes les parties concernées doivent donc être assurées que des scores élevés ont été obtenus dans des conditions fiables. L'administration de tests qui se déroulent en partie dans des conditions d'examen, avec une personne présente dans la salle ou surveillant à distance les progrès, entraîne toutefois des coûts substantiels.


En raison des coûts associés à la passation de ces tests, nous recommandons aux participants de s'assurer qu'ils possèdent des compétences supérieures avant de passer ces tests. Ceux dont les scores se situent dans la fourchette la plus élevée par rapport aux autres sur les histogrammes des figures 1 à 4 devraient en avoir une bonne compréhension et ils seront les plus susceptibles d'atteindre les normes requises. Toutefois, il n'est pas possible de garantir que même les personnes ayant obtenu les meilleurs résultats aux tests mis à la disposition du public réussiront la phase finale de l'examen. En effet, environ 10 % des personnes qui passent les examens n'atteignent pas les critères, même si leurs notes sont supérieures à celles de la grande majorité de la population (nous offrons toujours une possibilité de repasser les examens), tandis que 10 à 20 % obtiennent le statut de super-maître. L'Université de Greenwich n'est pas en mesure de fournir des prédictions sur les performances futures des candidats sur la base de leurs performances passées.


Un article décrivant les résultats de cette collaboration est actuellement en cours de préparation pour publication. Cela a pris plus de temps que prévu car le laboratoire a été exceptionnellement occupé par les projets de la police en 2021 et 2022. Nous espérons qu'il sera publié en 2023.


Éthique associée à notre base de données de volontaires


Tous les participants donnent leur accord pour que leurs données soient stockées. Dans un deuxième dépôt, les adresses courriel des participants sont également stockées afin qu'ils puissent continuer à être invités à participer à de futures recherches. Lorsque le règlement général sur la protection des données (RGPD) de l'UE est entré en vigueur en 2018, tous les participants ont de nouveau été informés par courriel de la sauvegarde de leurs données. En l'absence de réponse, les données correspondantes ont été supprimées. Les participants qui décident de passer les tests depuis lors reçoivent immédiatement les informations sur le GDPR et sur la possibilité de retirer leur consentement à tout moment.


Vous trouverez plus d'informations sur nos procédures éthiques et de protection des données ici.

Références


Anastasi, J. S., & Rhodes, M. G. (2005). An own-age bias in face recognition for children and older adults. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 12, 1043-1047. DOI: 10.3758/BF03206441


Belanova, E., Davis, J. P., & Thompson, T. (2018). Cognitive and neural markers of super-recognisers' face processing superiority and enhanced cross-age effect. Cortex, 98, 91-101. DOI:10.1016/j.cortex.2018.07.008 (Download pre-print here: https://bit.ly/bdtb2018)

Bobak, A. K., Pampoulov, P., & Bate, S. (2016). Detecting superior face recognition skills in a large sample of young British adults. Frontiers in Psychology, 7(1378). https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01378

Burton, A. M., White, D., & McNeill, A. (2010). The Glasgow face matching test. Behavior Research Methods, 42(1), 286-291. DOI:10.3758/BRM.42.1.286


Correll, J., Ma., D. S., & Davis, J. P. (2020). Perceptual tuning through contact? Contact interacts with perceptual (not memory-based) face-processing ability to predict cross-race recognition. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 92, 104058, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jesp.2020.104058

Davis, J. P. (2020). CCTV and the super-recognisers. In C. Stott, B. Bradford, M. Radburn, and L. Savigar-Shaw (Eds.), Making an Impact on Policing and Crime: Psychological Research, Policy and Practice (pp 34-67). London: Routledge. ISBN 9780815353577. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780429326592 (Download free pre-print here: https://bit.ly/34Phwjm)

Davis, J. P., Bretfelean, D., Belanova, E., & Thompson, T. (2020). Super-recognisers: face recognition performance after variable delay intervals. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 34(6), 1350-1368. DOI:10.1002/acp.3712 (Download free pre-print here: https://bit.ly/3slkg0m)


Davis, J. P., Treml. F., Forrest, C., & Jansari, A (2018). Identification from CCTV: Assessing police super recognisers ability to spot faces in a crowd and susceptibility to change blindness. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 32(3), 337-353. DOI: 10.1002/acp.3405 (Download pre-print here: https://bit.ly/3dtfj2018


Dennett, H. W., McKone, E., Tavashmi, R., Hall, A., Pidcock, M., Edwards, M., & Duchaine, B. (2011). The Cambridge Car Memory Test: A task matched in format to the Cambridge Face Memory Test, with norms, reliability, sex differences, dissociations from face memory, and expertise effects. Behavior Research Methods, 44(2), 587–605. https://doi.org/10.3758/s13428-011-0160-2


Fysh, M. C. (2018). Individual differences in the detection, matching and memory of faces. Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications, 3(1), 1-12.


Fysh, M. C., & Bindemann, M. (2018). The Kent face matching test. British Journal of Psychology, 109(2), 219-231.


Gentry, N. W., & Bindemann, M. (2019). Examples improve facial identity comparison. Journal of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition, 8(3), 376-385.

Gov.uk (2020). Population of England and Wales. Downloaded 20 November 2021 from, https://www.ethnicity-facts-figures.service.gov.uk/uk-population-by-ethnicity/national-and-regional-populations/population-of-england-and-wales/latest


Herlitz, A., & Lovén, J. (2013). Sex differences and the own-gender bias in face recognition: A meta-analytic review. Visual Cognition, 21(9-10), 1306-1336. https://doi.org/10.1080/13506285.2013.823140


Meissner, C. A., & Brigham, J. C. (2001). Thirty years of investigating the own-race bias in memory for faces: A meta-analytic review. Psychology, Public Policy, and Law, 7(1), 3-35. https://doi.org/10.1037/1076-8971.7.1.3


Robertson, D., Black, J., Chamberlain, B., Megreya, A. M., & Davis, J. P. (2020). Super-recognisers show an advantage for other race face identification. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 34(1), 205-216. DOI: 10.1002/acp.3608 (Download free pre-print here: https://bit.ly/rbcmd2020)


Russell, R., Duchaine, B., & Nakayama, K. (2009). Super-recognizers: People with extraordinary face recognition ability. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 16(2), 252–257. https://doi.org/10.3758/PBR.16.2.252


Annexe A : Test Could you be a super-recogniser (« Pourriez-vous être un super-reconnaisseur ? »)


Ce test amusant mesure la capacité à se familiariser avec un visage et à le reconnaître peu de temps après sous un angle parfois différent parmi un ensemble de feuilles très similaires. Il consiste en 14 essais dans lesquels une seule image faciale en noir et blanc est affichée pendant 5 secondes de face, à 30 degrés ou de profil, et est immédiatement suivie d'un ensemble de 6 ou 8 visages. Les participants sont avertis à l'avance que tous les essais comportent une cible. Au total, 7 millions de participants ont passé ce test.


Figure 1 : Fréquences des scores totaux (sur 14) du premier million de participants au test de 14 essais : Could you be a Super-Recogniser (M = 9,64, SD = 1,90) (Davis, 2019)


Annexe B : Tests décrits dans ce blog


Cambridge Face Memory Test : Étendu (CFMT+) (Russell et al., 2009). Ce test standardisé de 102 essais de mémoire des visages à court terme est probablement le test de reconnaissance des visages le plus utilisé dans le monde, bien qu'il n'ait pas été conçu à l'origine pour mesurer la super-reconnaissance. En raison d'anomalies telles que le fait que les visages sont principalement représentés sans cheveux, et que ce test est disponible sur Internet pour que les participants puissent s'entraîner depuis plusieurs années, il serait peu judicieux de définir quelqu'un comme un super-reconnaisseur de la police sur la base des résultats de ce seul test. Le score moyen de ce test dans la plupart des recherches est d'environ 70 sur 102 (écart-type = 10), et des scores de 90-95 sur 102 ont été utilisés pour diagnostiquer la super-reconnaissance dans des recherches précédentes, étant représentatifs de 2 écarts-type au-dessus des moyennes de contrôle, un score susceptible d'être atteint par environ 2% de la population.


Glasgow Face Matching Test (GFMT) (Burton et al., 2010). Ce test de 40 essais mesure la capacité à distinguer deux images de visage blanc-ethnique d'apparence très similaire. Il ne fait pas appel à la mémoire. Les participants décident si 40 paires de photographies faciales de haute qualité représentent la même personne ou non. La moitié des essais sont "appariés" (c'est-à-dire que la même personne est représentée dans la paire), l'autre moitié sont des essais de non-concordance. Les participants sont avertis à l'avance de la proportion d'essais appariés et non appariés, qui est aléatoire mais égale. Ce test peut ne pas convenir au " diagnostique " de super-reconnaissance car il présente des effets de plafond. De nombreux participants obtiennent un score de 100 %.


Le Kent Face Matching Test (KFMT) (Fysh & Bindemann, 2018). Ce test de 40 essais mesure la capacité à distinguer deux images faciales blanches-ethniques d'apparence très similaire. Il ne fait pas appel à la mémoire. Les participants décident si 40 paires de photographies faciales de haute qualité représentent la même personne ou non. La moitié des essais sont "appariés" (c'est-à-dire que la même personne est représentée dans la paire), l'autre moitié sont des essais de non-concordance. Les participants sont avertis à l'avance de la proportion d'essais appariés et non appariés, qui est aléatoire mais égale.


Short-Term Face Memory Test 30-60 (STFMT3060). Ce test de 60 essais mesure la mémoire à court terme des visages ethniques noirs et blancs non familiers. Dans la phase d'apprentissage de ce test, 30 visages masculins sont présentés séquentiellement dans des sweat-shirts violets identiques pendant 10 secondes. Dans la phase de test, de nouvelles photos des 30 "anciens" visages sont mélangées de manière aléatoire avec 30 "nouveaux" visages, portant une variété de sweat-shirts différents. Les participants répondent en indiquant si les visages sont "anciens" ou "nouveaux".


Cambridge Cars Memory Test (CCarMT) (Dennet et al., 2011 Ce test standardisé de mémoire à court terme de 72 essais a une structure identique à la version courte du Cambridge Face Memory Test. Il nous permet d'extraire les voitures des scores de visages pour générer une estimation de la capacité de mémoire des objets non-visages. Cependant, la capacité à reconnaître les voitures est en partie basée sur l'exposition et l'intérêt pour les voitures. Nous posons une question à ce sujet, afin de nous assurer que nous pouvons interpréter les résultats de manière appropriée. Cependant, un objectif pour 2022-2023 est de créer une série de trois tests de mémoire d'objets très différents. Nous pensons qu'il est peu probable que quelqu'un soit expert dans les quatre tests (y compris les voitures).


Annexe C : Liens vers les tests

Test amusant


Could you be a Super-Recogniser Test


Pour les participants qui souhaitent s'inscrire à des recherches futures.


Le lien vers les trois tests est ici (CFMT+, GFMT, STFMT3060): Anglais Allemand Français


Nous invitons toujours les participants à passer le Kent Face Matching Test et le Cambridge Cars Memory Test après avoir terminé la première batterie.


9,292 views